Envoy Gateway
Envoy proxy & GetEnvoy

Envoy API Gateway: The Gateway to a New Frontier

Today, the Envoy community announced an exciting new project: Envoy Gateway. The project unites industry leaders to streamline the benefits of application gateways powered by Envoy. This approach allows Envoy Gateway to immediately establish a solid foundation for rapid innovation. The project will provide a suite of services to manage an Envoy Proxy fleet, drive adoption through ease of use, and support a multitude of use cases through well-defined extension mechanisms.

Read More
Service Mesh Implementation
Envoy proxy & GetEnvoy, Istio, Tetrate

How Tetrate Service Bridge Workspaces Ease Service Mesh Implementation

“All problems in computer science can be solved by another level of indirection.” – David Wheeler

Service mesh is an architectural construct designed to ease software development and delivery in a microservices environment. Making service mesh work at scale requires some new thinking and the introduction of a few new abstractions.

Here at Tetrate, we have been working on service mesh – its opportunities and its challenges – as long as anyone around. This work is based on our founders’ and key employees’ existing and ongoing roles as founders and maintainers of the open source projects that are most widely used in service mesh implementations: the Envoy proxy, Istio service mesh software, and the Skywalking observability project.

To complement the open source projects, and to create a complete solution, we created Tetrate Service Bridge (TSB). TSB adds a highly functional management plane to service mesh implementations, collaborating with Istio as the control plane and Envoy as the data proxy.

Read More
CNCF project
Envoy proxy & GetEnvoy, Istio

Istio Applies to Become a CNCF Project

Today, I am happy to announce that the Istio project is announcing its intention to join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). I am very excited for this next step of the Istio project as it will further Tetrate’s mission, which is also my personal mission, to make Istio the industry standard project for service mesh.

My cofounders and I created Tetrate for this cause, and I have been dedicated to it since we conceived of the idea of Istio five years ago in the corridors at Google. Since a large number of organizations rely on Istio as infrastructure for their cloud native journey, CNCF is a natural home for the project to co-exist alongside other CNCF projects such as Kubernetes, Envoy, gRPC, and more.

Read More
Announcements, Envoy proxy & GetEnvoy

Launching Envoy Fundamentals, a training course to enable faster adoption of Envoy Proxy

Also published on: CNCF

Envoy Proxy, an open-source edge and service proxy, is a vital part of today’s modern, cloud-native application and is used in production by large companies like Booking.com, Pinterest, and Airbnb(Source). Tetrate, a top contributor to Envoy, has developed Envoy Fundamentals, free training with a completion certificate, to help enterprises adopt the technology faster. It will enable DevOps users, SREs, developers, and other community members to learn Envoy easily with concept text, practical labs, and quizzes. Tetrate is also the creator of the popular Istio Fundamentals training course and the open-source project Func-e, which makes it easier to adopt Envoy. 

Read More
Envoy proxy & GetEnvoy, Tetrate

Get started with Envoy Proxy in 5 minutes

Envoy is the engine that keeps Istio running. If you’re familiar with Istio, you know that the collection of all Envoys in the Istio service mesh is also referred to as the data plane

In this blog post, we’ll look at the fundamentals of Envoy: the building blocks of the proxy and, at a high level, how the proxy works. Understanding this will help you better understand how Istio works.

Read More
Envoy proxy & GetEnvoy, Events, Tetrate, Wasm

What can WebAssembly do for your Application Security and Extensibility

Years ago when I heard WebAssembly (Wasm) for the first time, I was intrigued. The fact that I can write code in Rust or C++ and have it running in a browser blew my mind immediately. Porting an existing browser-side computation from JS code to Rust results in an increased performance. Needless to say, I have high expectations from this technology. Sadly, due to personal circumstances, I haven’t had much time and opportunity to explore this technology further.

That is, until last week.

Read More